8 Myths about Reverse Camera Systems

Myth # 1: A wireless reverse camera system is the best option as I will save money on installation

Yes it’s true that you’ll save money on installation but to be perfectly blunt, wireless camera systems are rubbish. You see, all wireless camera systems run on the same frequency as other wireless electronics. Not only will the image be constantly cutting out due to interference, you might even pick up someone else’s CCTV footage. Not ideal if you are relying on the system for safety.

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Also, what a lot of people don’t actually realise is that you still have to pick up power for both the camera and monitor. A wired reverse camera may cost you a little more upfront but it will save you in the long run.

Myth # 2: I need a reverse camera with guidelines.  

Sure, guidelines are a great novelty feature. Who doesn’t want a handy guide indicated by coloured lines to show you when you need to stop reversing? Do you know what else is also great for this? A reference point! You see the best indication is actually being able to see part of your vehicle, ideally the tow ball or bumper.

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If you can’t mount the camera in a position where it can see part of your vehicle then we suggest opting for a reverse camera with guidelines.

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Myth # 3: Infrared reverse cameras are the best for night vision.

This is mostly true for cameras that are mounted up high like on caravans or motorhomes but it isn’t necessarily true for reverse cameras mounted lower. If a car behind you is shining its headlights directly into the camera lens, the infrared sensor doesn’t know whether it’s day or night time. The result? The monitor ends up getting flooded with a bright white light, leading to poor vision in lower light conditions.

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In most cases a non-infrared camera will receive enough light from your reverse lights when you are reversing. This will give you more than enough vision in low light conditions.

Myth # 4: I have heard that cameras with CCD imagers are better than CMOS.

This might be true if we were living back in 2005 when reverse cameras were fairly new to the market. Cameras with CMOS imagers were cheaper to produce therefore, showed a low quality grainy image. CCD imagers were much better in quality in comparison and were more expensive to produce.

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Welcome to 2018, where the demand for smaller components and lower power consumption is high  (e.g., cameras in mobile phones). Therefore, a lot of work has gone into improving the image quality of CMOS imagers. In fact these days, you might even find CMOS cameras to be a little bit better quality compared to the CCD cameras.

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CCD image
CMOS image

Myth # 5: I need a camera with audio so someone can help guide me at the back.

Sure I guess it might be helpful but let’s not forget that you are in the market for a reverse camera. You are buying a product that is literally designed to help you back into tight spots with no human assistance. Who wants to still get out of the car and guide someone reverse into a spot when one of the reasons you decided to get a reverse camera system was to stop arguing with your significant other.

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Not only that, but there’s a higher chance of water getting inside the reverse camera lens which is something you want to avoid at all costs.

Myth # 6: I can use any reverse camera for rear vision.

It depends, sure any camera will show you what’s behind the vehicle but the angle of the lens is going to affect how you perceive things behind you. Firstly, I only recommend rear vision for larger vehicles like caravans or motorhomes. These vehicles have a lot of blind spots and it can be nerve-racking driving in built up areas. Sedans, 4WDs, utes and other similar vehicles don’t really require rear vision. Don’t get me wrong these vehicles can be equipped with a rear vision camera but it’s not essential.

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For the caravans and motorhomes of the world, sometimes it pays to have a reverse camera dedicated to rear vision. You see what tends to happen is that the wider the camera lens, the more the depth perception will distort.

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For example, let’s say you have a 170 or 120 degree angle lens mounted on the back of your vehicle. You have a look at the monitor and you can vaguely see a car behind you but it looks like it’s a fair distance away. WRONG! Because of the wide angle lens, this is how it appears in the monitor but the car is actually quite close behind you.

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What you need is a narrow angle camera for long distance viewing. Ideally what you would want is a dual camera because you get the best of both worlds. 120 degree lens for reversing and a 45 degree lens for rear vision.

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Myth # 7: My caravan manufacturer has installed a reverse camera so I can just get any monitor and power cables to suit.

Unfortunately this is not true. We all tend to have different plugs and wiring configurations. This doesn’t mean that we can’t help you out we just need a bit of information about the camera, like what brand the camera is and what type of plug is fitted on the A frame.

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Myth # 8: I need to see the monitor in bright sunlight so it needs to have a sunshade or antiglare built in.

Yes it is true that these things help prevent glare in the sun and we even have these built into some of our monitors and in dash units. I hate to be the bearer of bad news here but you will never completely stop glare affecting you monitor. There will be different times of the day where it just cannot be helped, it is as simple as that really.

Who am i?

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My name is Nicole and I work for Polaris GPS & Rear Vision. I have been working here for 13 years and I have seen Reverse camera kits literally evolve over time.

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I see a lot of misleading information surrounding reverse camera systems and the main reason for me writing this article is because I want you, the consumer, to be well informed before making a decision as to what system you should buy.  We will always endeavour to supply you the right product to suit your needs.

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Check out or systems at www.polarisgps.com.au or give us a call on 1300 555 514.